Great Breweries in NYC

Great Breweries in NYC, by Ari KellenBreweries have been a part of New York City’s history since the days of New Amsterdam.  In the 19th century, German immigrants brought lager beer with them to New York, and by Prohibition there were 70 operating breweries in New York, most of them in Brooklyn.  Yet by 1976, there were zero.  But starting in the 80s and 90s, a homebrewing scene began to flourish in New York, which has since spawned numerous great breweries around the city.  Here are a couple of these, based off an article that I found online:

Threes Brewing: In addition to brewing, this place hosts art shows, concerts and community meetings.  They have a kitchen space that hosts restaurants from all over the city in two-week residencies, meaning that there’s something new every time you come.  Many of the beers here aren’t distributed beyond the brewery, so this is the best chance you have to taste them.  There are 24 different beers on taps, ranging from house-made to brews from out of state.  

Other Half Brewing Co: It’s pretty small, and can get really crowded on a weekend night (seating is limited to a single table).  But it’s not a place you want to miss; luckily, the brewery has plans to double the tasting room’s size.  This isn’t a place with any sort of “fancy” atmosphere, with a beat-up antelope head on the wall and an even more beat-up bartop that once went on tour with the Rolling Stones.  But the beer here is some of the best in New York.  If you ever decide to come out to Red Hook for some beef rib at Hometown, a couple games of Mini Golf at Brooklyn Crab or a sandwich at DeFonte’s, be sure to visit.

Singlecut Beersmiths: After falling in love with European lagers, Rich Buceta became a passionate homebrewer, quitting his job in advertising to get into brewing.  Starting out as a keg-cleaner, he’s started Singlecut, an Astoria brewery with an emphasis on fresh lagers.  The barn-like brewery regularly hosts live music, which has become a part of the brewery/bar’s culture: Buceta plays guitar, the bartenders are musicians in a band, and the bar features a top-notch record collection.

Transmitter Brewing: At this Long Island City warehouse, the brewers are constantly experimenting with brewing methods, yeast and bacteria strains and barrel aging.  The barrel collection includes casks that have held every sort of alcohol, from red wine to rum.  Since most of what they make is small-batch, beers tend to run out quickly, so visit the sampling room as soon as you can.

Bronx Brewery: This place is just a good time.  On weekend nights, it feels more like a house party than a brewery, with foosball tables, comfortable couches, a small bar and a dog-friendly backyard.  Even though they don’t have a kitchen of their own, you can order from all sorts of local restaurants, and there’s a free catered dinner on Friday nights.  

Gun Hill Brewing: Soaring ceilings and a no-nonsense atmosphere make Gun Hill a great place for novices to learn more about craft beer.  The goal here is to make great beers that don’t intimidate people.  If you’re a Yankees fan, it’s a good place to catch a game.  Across the street is a food truck with hearty Dominican fare, with Gun Hill customers getting a discount.  

Flagship Brewery: Staten Island is a place with plenty of great stuff, but it can be hard to get people out there.  Yet for those tenacious few who can get onto the ferry from downtown, Flagship Brewery is a short walk away from the landing.  Fridays and Saturdays offer live music, which on other days alternates between comedy, trivia and charity events.  

from Ari Kellen | New York City Exploration http://ift.tt/2axSFpq

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s